The first in a line of Packards: the story of Elizabeth

Building off the last post in this blog, where I pledged to write about more female ancestors, countering past gender imbalances, I’d like to focus on Elizabeth, the wife of Samuel Packard, who came over with a child, likely Mary, in 1638 from Hingham, a town in Norfolk County, England, to Hingham, a settlement in Plymouth County, Massachusetts. Many aspects of her life are an utter mystery. Her surname, long speculated to be Stream, is unknown, and is often given second billing, when it comes to efforts by Packard descendants to remember the past, elevating Samuel Packard above her, even by those than communicated with my grandfather, Bob Mills, or those that communicated with me in the past. The same is the case in contemporary records during the time her husband, Samuel, was alive, already implying was a second-class citizen. But, who was she, and why does she matter?

As I’ve written in the past, Elizabeth seems to have met Samuel when he moved to Norfolk County, which was north of Suffolk County, where he was born, reportedly in the Red House Farm. I am, to be clear, indirectly descended from both people. Apart from that, she had, at least nine children with Samuel, along with five grandchildren. [1] I tied to break this down into a listing so its much easier for you (and me) to understand those mentioned in Samuel’s will:

  1. Elizabeth X, wife of Samuel
  2. Samuel, son of Samuel and Elizabeth, eldest son
  3. Zaccheus, son of Samuel and Elizabeth
  4. John, son of Samuel and Elizabeth
  5. Nathaniel, son of Samuel and Elizabeth
  6. Mary, daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth, wife of Richard Phillips
  7. Hannah, daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Randall
  8. Jaell, daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth, wife of John Smith
  9. Deborah, daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Washburn
  10. Grandchild Israel Augur, son of ???
  11. Grandchild Caleb Philips, son of Richard? Phillips
  12. Grandchild Israel Packard, son of Zaccheus
  13. Grandchild Samuel Packard, son of Samuel
  14. Grandchild Daniel Packard, son of Samuel

In his will on October 29, 1684, Elizabeth received some money from her husband and much, much more. This included gobs and jobs of land, including:

  • his farm in the town of Bridgewater (36 acres), along with lands and meadows connected to the farm
  • share of meadow called Bullshole for life
  • all his goods and cattle
  • 40 pounds for life
  • 20 acres of land lying in Bridgewater between lands owned by James Keith and Joseph Hayward near Satuckett Pond
  • all money and chattle shall be divided equally among his children and grandchildren after she dies
  • a feather bed, which shall be given to his grandchild Deliverance Augur after her death
  • one of the joint executors of his estate along with her son Samuel

That’s a sizable amount!

After Samuel died, she married a man, likely in late 1684 or perhaps in early 1685, by the name of John Washburn, a long-time Bridgewater resident. He would die sometime after October 30, 1686, outlining the following in his will [2]:

to my Wife Elizabeth Washbourne one Bed one Boulster one Pillow two pair of sheets one Blanket one Coverlet two chests Six bushels of Indian Corne one bushell of Barley. ffarther with Respect to money which was my wives part whereof I have already laid out for her we are agreed that I should Returne to her two pounds and ten shillings which I have already done.

Of course, she is not mentioned at all in his inventory. [3]

Over ten years after Samuel’s death, on October 27, 1694, Elizabeth sold land given to her by Samuel: a 20-acre tract called “Satuckett Pond” or “Sehucket Pond,” selling the  the land to “an Indian” living in Bridgewater named Sam James for five pounds. [4] This agreement would be signed by Samuel’s son of the same name, Samuel Packard, Jr., along with two others, while identifying her as “Elizabeth Washburn Widow of the Town of Bridgewater”:

Most importantly, in this agreement she explicitly noted herself as married to Samuel, calling him her “first husband”:

“…by these presents convent with the said Sam James his heirs & assigners I…at the lime of making over and passing away said Land unto the said Sam James stood truley & lawfully peired and processed with the same & every part and parcel thereof of a good lure, lawfully & absolute Estate of Inheritance, by virtual of my first Husband, vis: Samuel Packard his will, and therefor, I have full power to Bargain, Sell, Grant, alienate, and pass away the piece onto said Sam James.

It goes on from there in legalise, basically saying she has the right to give Sam James the land. This transcription may not be completely correct, so I’d recommend you read the full page below, as I could have made errors:

Many years later, in April 1702, Elizabeth, still a “widow,” would sign a document about John Washburn’s heirs, receiving some rights. I came to the conclusion this is her as she is called “Elizabeth Solo” (widow):

“Massachusetts Land Records, 1620-1986,” images, FamilySearch, Bristol, Deeds 1699-1709 vol 3-5, image 304 of 806, page 83, county courthouses and offices, Massachusetts.

That is the last record we have of her. What I have posed here goes far beyond what I wrote in the past. Further recommendations for how I can find more about Elizabeth are appreciated, as I’m planning to focus on later Packard ancestors in the future.


Notes

[1] Last Will and Testament of Samuell Packer, Oct. 29, 1684, Plymouth Colony Records, Wills Vol. 3, Part 2, Plymouth Registry of Deeds, Massachusetts, Plymouth County, Probate Records, Plymouth, p. 96-98, images 585586 of 616.

[2] “Massachusetts, Plymouth County, Probate Records, 1633-1967,” images, FamilySearch, Probate records 1686-1702 and 1849-1867 vol 1-1F, image 49 of 490, pages 84-85; State Archives, Boston.

[3] “Massachusetts, Plymouth County, Probate Records, 1633-1967,” images, FamilySearch, Probate records 1686-1702 and 1849-1867 vol 1-1F, image 50 of 490, pages 86; State Archives, Boston.

[4] “Massachusetts Land Records, 1620-1986,” images, FamilySearch, Plymouth, Deeds 1712-1714 vol 10, images 183-184 of 651, page 333, 334-5; county courthouses and offices, Massachusetts.

The Packards in Tennessee and a research bust

On July 3rd, I noted on Twitter that I had found a number of Packards “on the indexes of the Tennessee State Library and Archives website.”

The Tennessee State Library & Archives lists four entries for the Packards.  The first of these is Noah S. Packard, with the record of his death found within the W. R. Cornelius Burial Records, noting his death in 1865 in Indiana, part of Company D, Regiment/Unit/Line 151. So, I dug a little further to learn more about this Noah Packard and T.E. Packard, who died the same year but in Wisconsin, and was in Company A and Regiment/Unit/Line 18.

Finding information about Noah was tough, because the only entry for a Noah, who died in 1865, was someone buried in Tennessee. For T.E. Packard, nothing turned up on Find A Grave either. I couldn’t find any obits for either of them, unfortunately. There was just a bunch of false drops. Searches on Family Search were also fruitless, for both of these Packards.

The next person, chronologically, was Thomas Packard. He died in 1916, as noted in the Tennessee Death Records 1914-1933 (specifically vol. 30, record #363), in Knox County, Tennessee. No results could be found on Find A Grave, sadly. He also seemed strangely mysterious, like the other Packards I had mentioned, since I couldn’t find anything on him either! I found two results for Thomas Packards, one who died in Lawrence, Tennessee and another who died in Chattanooga. Neither seemed to be the same as this man. Sadly, all that could be found was a “Thomas Parker” who died in 1916, no Thomas Packard…

Then there was Lethe Packard who died in 1928, whose record also could be found in the Tennessee Death Records 1914-1933 collection (specifically Record #: 22500), dying in Shelby County. There were no results whatsoever on newspapers.com when looking up his name. Results on Family Search seemed to lead to nothing until I stumbled upon a Tennessee Death certificate! [1] It named his parents and everything. What a great find! It could lead to further answers to who this man was.

It showed his father was E.E. Packard, who was born in Georgia and his mother was Mary Bond, although her birthplace was not known.  Although his date of birth was wrong (it shouldn’t have been 1928 but should have been 1872), it did note he was born in Arkansas and that he was single, even though he was age 56.

Until next time!


Notes

[1] “Tennessee Deaths, 1914-1966,” database with images, FamilySearch, Lethe Packard, 29 Sep 1928; Death, Memphis, Shelby, Tennessee, United States, Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville.

From slaveowners to liberators: the Packard family and slavery

Prof. Farnsworth describes how Fry is his uncle, branching off an ugly and filthy branch in the Futurama episode “All the President’s Heads” (S8, e10). This is how I could feel about my ancestors who participated in enslaving other human beings, but I do not feel that way in the slightest.

Recently on Twitter, I said that  Zachariah Packard, my great-great-great-great-great-great-great grand uncle was the “only connection to slavery I have found so far other than Theophilus Packard, husband of famed E.P.W. Packard, seeming to support slavery,” responding to a tweet linking to my article on this blog about how Zachariah was a slaveowner. This was fact was also clear from the 1771 Massachusetts tax inventory, which was only recently made available. However, what I said is only partially accurate, as I had forgotten, that not only was Zachariah a slaveowner but so were his sons Nathan and Nathaniel, his daughter Abigail, and his wife Abigail, due to the stipulations outlined in his last will and testament, along with other parts of his probate like his inventory! These enslaved peoples (named “America Pierce,” “Peter,” and “Ann”) went from person to person, then disappeared from the record as none are listed in Nathaniel’s will in 1794, except for a 1790 census for Bridgewater listing an “America Pierce” and a “Peter Pierce.”

However, Zachariah was not the only one involved. For one, Captain Samuel Packard (my great-great-great-great-great grand uncle) sailed a ship to the coast of the African continent in 1797, “looking for Black Africans to enslave…contrary to Rhode Island law,” forced to sign a pledge he would leave the slave trade behind, which he seems to have honored. Secondly, Charles Chilion Packard, my great-great-great-great-great grand uncle, of Charleston, South Carolina (but born in Plainfield) “had the ten slaves from the estate of his wife’s deceased first husband” in 1820. Indirectly, the Packards that lived in New England, specifically in Massachusetts, were involved in that the region depended on a “trading system that serviced the wealthier slave-based economy of the West Indies,” which constituted an interconnected trade network.

At the same time, there were those who were directly opposed to slavery, like my great-great-great-great-great grand uncle, William Packard, organizing “a petition asking the United States Congress to abolish slavery and the slave trade in DC.” He also not only attended “several abolition meetings in Northampton through the 1830s and 1840s, likely starting the Cummington abolitionist society. His strong sentiments for abolitionism were shared by his uncle,  Rev. Theophilus Packard (my great-great-great-great-great grand uncle). This Theophilus, was “vice president of the antislavery society in Massachusetts, in the 1830s” and would be a dedicated anti-slavery crusader for years and years. This differed from his son, Theophilus (my great-great-great-great grand uncle) and his wife, E.P.W. (Elizabeth Parsons Ware) Packard (my great-great-great-great aunt in-law), who seemed to scowl at her sentiments that slavery was a sin. She also compared marriage to slavery, a comparison many made at the time despite the fact it was deeply problematic and carried with it horrible connotations. You could also say that William Henry Packard (my great-great-great grandfather), who fought in Louisiana during the Civil War (along with a host of other Packard ancestors), was effectively on the side against slavery, along with another distant ancestor, my great-great-great grandfather Lawrence Weber (not a Packard), who fought in a gunboat to stop Confederate blockade runners. [1]

There were other Packards I found, including one Reverend E. N. Packard (whose full name is Edward Newman Packard and lived in Dorchester, MA), who is my great-great-great uncle, and Adelpus Spring Packard (my great-great-great-great uncle), a professor of Bowdoin College, both in opposition to slavery rather than in favor. After all, there were two Packards in Topeka, Kansas (Cyrus and Sarah Burrows) who sheltered “runaway slaves” time and time again.

Until next time, as this post opens up a lot of avenues for further exploration on this blog, without a doubt!

The UK’s National Archives are ‘packed with Packards’

Back in May 2018, I covered records of the Packard name in the UK’s National Archives. It shows that the earliest mention of the name as “Packard” was in 1367. It also indicates that Packards were concentrated in, with dates of residence indicated by the records in parentheses:

Map is courtesy of familypedia. Used myenglandtravel as a guide to names of counties so they could be labeled correctly

This is worth pointing out as it shows where the Packards are concentrated, in the eastern part of England, specifically the counties of Suffolk (most common), Norfolk, and Essex,  all of which consist an area known as “East Anglia”:

This fits with where Samuel Packard and his family were born, although records of them in Suffolk is a bit thin, unfortunately,  including claims of the “Red House”  he was apparently born in. In fact, in one of my  earliest articles, I covered an article saying that Samuel was baptized September 17, 1612 in Stonham Aspal, Suffolk, England, and part of existing family legend, even promoted by the Stonham Apsal Village. There  is evidence that Samuel’s father, George, was born and lived in Suffolk as well. [1] This was also covered by Dale Cook in his page on the “Samuel Packard family” while another genealogist, Margaret Odrowaz Sypniewski, wrote that on her page, titled “The Packard Family” (which has been archived here):

They [the Packards] Came from Stonham Aspal, Suffolk County, England; to Bridgewater, Plymouth County, Massachusetts on the Diligent. The Diligent sailed from Ipswich, England; in June, and arrived in Boston Harbor, Massachusetts on August 10, 1638…The surname Packard is French. It means the descendant of Bacard (combat, strong).(Source: New Dictionary of American Family Names by Elsdon C. Smith. New York: Gramercy Publishing Company, 1988). The name Packard appears in English records as early as the beginning of the fourteenth century. The name was well established in East Anglia long before Samuel’s birth…in early Norman records I found Ralph, Engeram, Richard, Peter, Geoffrey, and Walter Picard in Normandy from 1180-1196. Then we find a Robert Pichard in England circa 1198; and a John Pikert circa 1274. How and if these early Picards/Pikerts relate to later generations is not known. However, I found my own lineage in the parish records for Woolpit, Suffolk County, England…How these two Georges relate, to each other, is unsure, but most current scholars place the second George as father to Samuel Packard who immigrated to Massachusetts. Since they also note them as the elder and younger Earls Stonham, and the fact that they married only one year apart, tells us that Ann Garrard was NOT his first wife. In 1080, Suffolk was a county predominantly of villages and freeman, rather than manors and feudal vassals. Its population was fairly evenly distributed. None of the seven principal towns, which included Ipswich, Bury St. Edmunds, and Dunwich, had over 3000 residents.

While this does seem to generally fit with what  I have said here, what about the claim that Picard was French and turned into Packard?  I already have argued on here that it is wrong to call Samuel Packard a Huguenot. After all, with some saying that the name “Pykarde” is  a deviation from Packard or Packarde, there are over 60 results for the surname from 1200 to 1699 in the records of the National Archives of the UK. The same name “Picard” appears multiple times in the same records:

13th  century

14th century:

Not known:

  • various dates: “Feoffment by Gervase le Cordewaner, citizen of London, to John, the prior, and the canons, of Holy Trinity, London, of 16s. quit rent which Henry de Birchangre, tanner, used to pay him for the whole tenement he held of him in the suburb of London, without Crepelgate, in the parish of St. Giles, in ‘Everardeswellestrat’ within the bar, between land of Geoffrey Chipere and of Reginald Hopheldere, which land was formerly Henry Myttehere’s; consideration, 11 marks in gersum. Witnesses: Nicholas Bat, then mayor, John de Norhamton, Richard Picard, sheriffs, Stephen Bukerel, alderman of the ward, Lawrence de Frowyk, Nicholas son of Joceus, aldermen, Philip, rector of the church of St. Giles, and others (named). London.”
  • various dates: “conveyed property in 1250 to John Picard (to settle on the heirs of his daughter’s marriage to Felicia’s son)”
  • undated: “Grantor: PICARD, John and Basilia, his wife Grantee HUREL, Alexander, citizen of Chester Grant of lands in Newbold, Chester, paying 4d p.a. to Philip, clerk” (a second time)

There are other records that can be looked at later on this topic. When they say “norman records” I don’t know what they are referring to specifically. I have found no record in the National Archives records of “a Robert Pichard in England circa 1198” or a “John Pikert circa 1274.”Even so, their assessment that “how and if these early Picards/Pikerts relate to later generations is not known” is accurate. There is even a Packard Avenue in Ipswich. To solve these issues, there will need to be more in-person research at the Suffolk Records Office or elsewhere. Until next time!


Notes

[1] Others on genealogy pages, geni.com (with Robert Glen Packard citing various sources), connectedbloodlines, WMGS Members’ Genealogy, and Scott White, made similar arguments.

The story of Packardsville, MA

Newspaper clipping from the Brandon Times in Brandon Wisconsin on page 2 of the paper’s January 4, 1883 edition that mentions Packardsville, MA. This same article was also printed in the National Tribune of Washington, D.C. on December 28, 1882, along with other newspapers in Kansas, Wilmington, DE, and Lancaster, PA

In the Geographic Names Information System (GNIS), run by the USGS, there are a number of places with “Packard” in the name. One of those is Packardsville, Massachusetts, still listed on a Wikipedia page of “list of villages in Massachusetts” but not citing any sources. The GNIS entry on this place says it is “0.8 mi SE of Knights Corner and 3.2 mi SSE of Pelham; Town of Pelham.” [1] There is evidence certain Packards lived there. There was some talk about this on the message boards of Ancestry, with some mentioning the existence of the town of Packardsville, with one user, named Debbe, writing that “the documentation shows Samuel Packard born 1794, Packardsville, Mass. died 1826 at Enfield, Mass. was in the war of 1812.” Another user on a related forum writes that they are “looking for any information on Theodore L. Gold” whom they state “resided in Packardville, MA or Palmer, MA during late 1800’s.” Apart from this, other users note that: Freelove Packard, who married Cyrus Clark Miner of Leyden, Massachusetts, lived in Packardsville, that two people (George Myron Gamwell and Charlotte Adelia Hanks) married there. This raises the question of whether the defunct Packardsville Cemetery in Enfield, Massachusetts is connected? As such, there needs to be some further investigation.

In 1788, the southern district of Packardsville was annexed by Pelham. By the early 19th century, Packardsville had developed into a “craft village.” [2] By the 1830s, a man with the last name of Packard and Thurston were making carriages within the village, a business that continued into the 1840s, generating thousands of dollars, until the firm left and moved to Belchertown. By the 1860s, there was apparently a congregational Church in the village. By 1874, Packardsville was still within the town of Pelham with one church, while sitting nearby the Jabish River and adjacent to Belchertown. It was, at the time, manufacturing village. Eleven years later, there were two villages listed as “Packardsville” in Massachusetts, one in Pelham and another in Pittsfield. By 1906, Packardsville was still as village within Pelham. A later survey ten years later said that Cadwell Creek goes through Packardsville. And, in 1932, any further burials in the Packardsville Cemetery by the Packardsville Church in Enfield, MA was prohibited. In the years that followed, before WWII, the Quabin Reservoir was constructed which flooded part of Packardsville, including a Baptist Church which was founded in 1831 (with the church building constructed in 1835). Undoubtedly this led to displacement of some individuals within the village, itself.

But how did it get its name? Well, page 11 of Carlene Riccelli’s “Place-Names of Pelham, Massachusetts Above and Below* Water” has the answer to that, noting that there was even a Packardsville Road that led into the town:

Named for Joel Packard sho[wed up] in the year 1840 [and] built a wagon manufacturing shop with a Mr. Thruston at the south end of town. Since that time the hamlet was call ed Packardsville .

Otherwise, there really wasn’t much else I could find about Packardsville, even from the Pelham Historical Society as of yet. If you have any stories about this village, hamlet, or whatever you want to call it, I’d love to hear them.


Notes

[1] They cite a source for this information: U.S. Geological Survey. Geographic Names Phase I data compilation (1976-1981). 31-Dec-1981. Primarily from U.S. Geological Survey 1:24,000-scale topographic maps (or 1:25K, Puerto Rico 1:20K) and from U.S. Board on Geographic Names files. In some instances, from 1:62,500 scale or 1:250,000 scale maps. There was also a Packardsville, Missouri as well, apparently.

[2] Massachusetts Historical Commission, “MHC Reconnaissance Survey Town Report PELHAM,” October 1982, pp 1, 2, 5, 8, 9;  Elias Nason, A Gazetteer of the State of Massachusetts (B. B. Russell, 1874), p 402; Massachusetts Bureau of Statistics of Labor, Census of Massachusetts: 1885, Volume 1, Part 1 (Wright & Potter Print. Company, state printers, 1887), p 24, 32, 35; Public Documents of Massachusetts: Being the Annual Reports of Various Public Officers and Institutions …, Volume 11 (State Printers, 1906), p 231; Charles Henry Pierce and Henry Jennings Dean, Surface Waters of Massachusetts, Issues 413-415 (U.S. Government Printing Office, 1916), p 318. There was also a mention of a merchant, Jacob Gould, in Packardsville, likely in the 19th century.

Tommy Adkins, Bob Mills, and the wonders of genealogy

Genealogy chart in Tommy Adkins’ letter to Bob Mills

On October 17, 1979, ten months after the estate of Tom Packard had been closed, Tommy L. Adkins (of 4825 Roscommon Drive in Lansing, Michigan) wrote Bob Mills, asking for help in gathering the history of his family, using a  genealogy pedigree chart. Following this form letter, he notes that “after your  grandmother [Mable Hattie Packard?] past the family just sort of lost track of your grandmothers side of the family,” asking for any assistance, noting he has “records, documents and such on the packard side going back as far as 1636 to Samuel Packard.” He further claimed he had “verified many times over this info every step of the way” and also has the “names of a good many of the brothers & sisters, aunts and uncles etc.” That may be a bit optimistic, because looking back at the claims now, a number of them are clearly faulty.

On October 21st, Bob wrote Tommy Adkins a letter of response, saying that he was  thrilled because “Mabel [sic, should be Mable] Hattie Packard and the Landstroms were household words in my father and grandfather’s  houses.” He further noted that while  he  never met Mable, that his family, and himself, “made several trips to Shelburne Falls and Heath, and exchanged visits with Charlie Packard, John Packard, and Margaret Packard during my youth.” He also added that Tommy’s interest in family history was interesting, since he added information “from a  family chart I made up in 1970 which hangs on our wall at home.”

This is the family chart Bob created

He then hilariously, before accounting  the children of Cyrus Winfield Packard with Dora Mills and Clementina Cheney, calls him “the  prolific old goat that started much of the recent family history with three  wives producing 12  children.” After that, he notes that his grandfather, RBM I (“Uncle Rob”)  “managed hotels in Cincinnati and elsewhere,” dying in 1950, with his wife Hattie E. Mills dying in 1949, also in Cincinnati, with his grandparents  and parents buried in a family plot in Spring Grove Cemetery.

He goes on in his letter by noting that Uncle Rob and Hattie “adopted my father and changed his name to Mills when he was very young,” and that they had a “child of their own, Stanley Sterling Mills, born in 1901 who died in 1934 in some bizarre manner.” He then outlines his own two children, those of his sister Helen, and those  of his sister  Carol. He ends by saying that he is “fascinated with your chart going back to Samuel Packard in 1636,”  adding that he believes “migrated from Hingham, England,” asking  “since my records are very sketchy, could you send me a copy of your history? I would appreciate it very much.” That is how family histories were conducted then and are done much differently now, without a doubt.

The letter ends by him noting his role as a professor of psychology and criminal justice  at the University of Cincinnati, “where I direct our graduate program in criminal justice,” noting that he would be glad to give more details if Tommy would like.

Following this is the response from Tommy, which reveals much about him and his life. The letter, mostly in blue pen ink on hole-punched paper, is undated, but I would say it would have to be written in either late October 1979 or early November 1979. Of course, Tommy was, as he notes in his letter,  delighted to hear fro Bob, adding that they are “cousins through my wife Janet Elizabeth (Hall) Adkins,  who by the way sends her regards  and best wishes.” He  then gladly remarked that it was a  pleasure to be “finally contacted [by] someone in the family who wants to  know the families[‘] history.” He then buffs out the Packards  by declaring it “one of the oldest families in this country,” saying members served in King Philips’ War in 1675-6,  adding that “I feel we all need  to know where we come from so that we can better understand who we are,” which is often a motto for genealogists!

He prefaces his list of family information  by  saying that Bob should bar with him including with his handwriting because “the only time I actually have to keep up with my correspondence is late in  the  evening.” He then lists the generations, which can be visualized as follows, showing 10 generations: RBM  III-RBM II-Cyrus W.-William H.-Barnabas III-Barnabas II-Barnabas I-John-Zaccheus-Samuel. He adds to this that “there were  three Barnabas’s in a row each of the last  two [were] the son of the former.” After that, he was apparently tired, as he  says “that’s about all the energy left in me” as he switches to pencil for some reason (maybe because its easier than writing in pen? He notes that  Harold Packard died one year after Tom Packard which was “a great shame,” and that he has “a great amount of history  on  other members of the family not in our direct  line” which he would send if he had  time.

He closes his letter by talking about himself and his wife Janet  or “Jan.” He notes he is an auditor for HEW, saying that he and Jan moved to Lansing, Michigan from Massachusetts in June of that year Additionally they have three children, he notes, who are as  follows: Thomas A. Adkins (born Feb 17, 1967 in the Panama Canal Zone), Heathe  Jo  Adkins (born June 29, 1970 at Walter Reed), and Sarah Christen Adkins (born September 11, 1971 in Shirley, Massachusetts). The letter ends by  saying he became interested in genealogy three years before (in 1976) and has, since then, “some remarkable  success, [and] also  some setbacks,” while also asking for the birthdays and places of birth of Bob’s children, as it likely seemed like a fair trad to him, perhaps.

What happened to Tommy Adkins?  I don’t know, as I could only find, with  a quick search a person of the same name in Georgia, but not one in Michigan. Searches for the others have been, at this time, unsuccessful, even when looking at who lives at that current address at the present time.

That’s all. Until next time!

Sources used  for this post

Genealogy-letter pedigree form letter and short letter on back from Tommy Adkins to Bob Mills, October 17, 1979

Typescript letter of Bob Mills to Tommy Adkins, October 21, 1979, within Family Records folder and black binder for family records.

Handwritten letter of Tommy Adkins  to Bob Mills, likely late October 1979 or early November 1979, within Family Records folder and black binder for family records.

Settling the estate of Tom Packard: letters from 1976 to 1979

On May 24, 1976, Doris F. Alden, an attorney from Rogers, Reppucci, Alden, Turner & Burgess, sent a letter to Bob Mills about the estate of Tom Packard. Apart from enclosing a legal notice about  the selling of the land “beyond  the cemetery,” the  West Hills Cemetery, to help “met demands for estate taxes.” The letter went onto say that the sale of the remainder of the old farm, “including the remains of the sugar house and acreage having little or no frontage on the highway is pending.”

Three  days later, on May 27, Bob thanked Doris for the letter, as it summarized the “estate of my late uncle, Thomas Packard,” hoping to continue to be informed on the estate’s progress. He also added that he may be passing through Springfield on a vacation that summer and if so he would contact her in order to “meet with you briefly at  that time.”

The following month, on June 7th, Doris sent another legal letter, this one with a citation to sell the other parts of Tom’s estate she had mentioned in her original letter  to Bob. She also added that Tom, during his lifetime sold various parcels, but that this sale will “include the largest portion of such back acreage which, under the zoning by-laws of the Town of Plainfield, does not meet current building requirements.” After ending this legalistic letter by saying that he will receive additional notices as time went on, she wrote in script,  “thank you for your letter,” clearly glad Bob had posed that he go to vacation in Springfield.

Later that month, on June 14th, Doris wrote Bob once again, whom she had talked with, especially regarding his “possible interest in the property,” even enclosing a photograph of  the house itself and describing what was within it. The photo of the house she refers to is at the beginning of this post. She sells the area as a great ski country and a “delightful place for retirement.” The letter is ended by her saying that it would “please me, as well as the  community, to keep a member of the Packard family on  West Hill, as that area is called” and that she is looking forward to meeting  him.

Notes by Bob about Tom Packard’s estate

The next month, on July 27th, Doris wrote Bob once again, talking about further division of Tom Packard’s estate, even attaching a new citation of selling more of the state, saying she will keep him informed. She added, in script, at the bottom of the letter, that “the 5 and 10 acre parcels referred to in my last  letter are still available.”

Then there was a gap of time, which even  surprised Bob. He wrote, in the next letter on October 2, 1977, that since the last exchange of letters and a call in July 1976, there had been “no word of progress on the Thomas Packard estate.” He further noted that while he was considering a trip to Massachusetts, it “did not prove  possible because of other commitments.” With that, h asked if it would be possible to obtain a progress report, noting that “my sister, Carol Mills Sieck, and I were discussing this matter last night, and realized that a good deal of time had elapsed since our last report on the  status  of the estate.”

Four days  later, on October 6, Doris wrote that a short report on Tom Packard’s estate was prepared not only for him but for all “heirs or their legal representatives.” This report noted that sale of a small parcel of real estate which was owned by Tom was pending since August 1977, with delay in a progress report hoping that “the sale would take place so that amended estate tax returns may be completed. The rest of the report noted that taxes were filed, with moving toward closing the estate soon, saying that once the “remaining parcel of land is sold, a final accounting will be prepared with a request that distribution of all assets in the estate be allowed.”

Three was again another gap. On July 20, 1978, Doris wrote Bob again about the estate, enclosing a new decree, which closed the estate, allowing, if there is no appeal within thirty days of July 12, then the estate’s funds will be distributed. The end was finally in sight, although  Bob did not, clearly, seem interested in purchasing Tom’s land or the property on which he lived as he had previously.

On August 25, there was another letter from Doris to Bob, which is a bit wrinkled. The letter itself enclosed a check  of $5,610.69 as his share of Tom Packard’s estate. The phrase, in this letter was  likely underlined by Bob: “all taxes, estate, inheritance and income, will have been paid for all funds received by you.”

The final letter, from Doris on January 25, 1979, was for one final check which represented a final payment from Tom Packard’s state, the amount of $117.54. The estate was finally closed.

We do not know from here what happened to Doris (although she could be the woman of the same name whom died in 2000), but we know that Bob died on May 2, 1981 from a brain tumor. But where one story ends, another can begin, another can be discovered, new stories unearthed.

Description of sources of this post

Probate Court citation for Thomas T. Packard of Plainfield, Hampshire County, Massachusetts, May 21, 1976, within Family Records folder and black binder for family records. This also notes that the citation will be printed in a Northampton newspaper, Daily Hampshire Gazette.

Typescript letter of Doris F. Alden to Bob Mills, May 24, 1976, within Family Records folder and black binder for family records.

Typescript letter of Bob Mills to Doris F. Alden, May 27, 1976, within Family Records folder and black binder for family records.

Probate Court citation for Thomas T. Packard of Plainfield, Hampshire County, Massachusetts, June 16, 1976, within Family Records folder and black binder for family records. This also notes that the citation will be printed in a Northampton newspaper, Daily Hampshire Gazette.

Typescript letter of Doris F. Alden to Bob Mills, June 7, 1976, within Family Records folder and black binder for family records.

Typescript letter of Doris F. Alden to Bob Mills, June 14, 1976, within Family Records folder and black binder for family records.

Probate Court citation for Thomas T. Packard of Plainfield, Hampshire County, Massachusetts, July 20, 1976, within Family Records folder and black binder for family records. This also notes that the citation will be printed in a Northampton newspaper, Daily Hampshire Gazette.

Typescript letter of Doris F. Alden to Bob Mills, July 27, 1976, within Family Records folder and black binder for family records.

Typescript letter of Bob Mills to Doris F. Alden, October 2, 1977, within Family Records folder and black binder for family records.

Typescript letter of Doris F. Alden to Bob Mills, October 6, 1977, within Family Records folder and black binder for family records. Includes a “status report” of the estate of Tom Packard.

Typescript letter of Doris F. Alden to Bob Mills, July 20, 1978, within Family Records folder and black binder for family records.

Typescript letter of Doris F. Alden to Bob Mills, August 25, 1978, within Family Records folder and black binder for family records. Letter is unfortunately crinkled, unless other letters.

Typescript letter of Doris F. Alden to Bob Mills, January 25, 1979, within Family Records folder and black binder for family records. Letter is unfortunately crinkled, unless other letters.