Chapter V: The children of Samuel and Elizabeth

This is the 7th in a series of articles which serializes my family history, which I wrote in November 2017, titled “From Samuel to Cyrus: A fresh look at the History of the Packard Family.” Minor corrections in spelling. Below is the 5th chapter of that history:

In order to wrap up the story of Samuel and Elizabeth, it is vital to focus on their children as a launching pad for further investigation. While some genealogical sources, from Ancestry biographies of these individuals, are cited, the best information possible is used in this chapter. [62] Likely in late 1684, Samuel’s wife, Elizabeth, would marry a man named John Washburn Jr. who had been living in Bridgewater for years. The only mention of this in The Packard/Mills Family History is the following statement: “following her husband’s death in 1684, Elizabeth Stream Packard was said to have married John Washburn. Information is rather sketchy.” As this chapter will show, there is no reason to say that information like that is “sketchy” anymore, as it is proven they married.

In following years, Samuel and Elizabeth’s children would be determining their own destiny. In 1685, John may have signed (likely not him) an agreement about township boundaries of the town named Rowley and village of the same name and would be recorded as a “proprietor” in Bridgewater. [63]

On October 30, 1686, John Washburn, Jr. would write his will. Other than grants to his children, undoubtedly from a previous marriage, he would give Elizabeth one bed, one booster, one pillow, one pair of sheets, and one blanket for starters.  [64] He would also give her one coverlet, two chests, six baskets of Indian corn, one bushel of barley, and two pounds, two shillings, which he had already given to her at the time. Like Samuel, John Washburn owned numerous farm tools and supplies, such as Indian corn, rye, scythes, iron wedges, chains, hoes, pitchforks, cart, wheels, whip, and saws. [65] He also mirrored Samuel in his show of status not with brass, iron, and pewter spoons, his bees wax or ammunition, but through table cloths, napkins, and five beds, to name a few possessions.

Two final records would prove that Elizabeth married John Washburn once and for all. On October 27, 1694, almost eight years after John’s death, she would sell land given to her by Samuel. [66] It would be a 20-acre tract called “Satuckett Pond” or “Sehucket Pond” given to her by Samuel in his will, as noted in chapter 4, saying explicitly that Samuel was her first husband as she sold the land to “an Indian” living in Bridgewater named Sam James. The land agreement would be signed by Samuel’s son of the same name, Samuel Packard, Jr., along with Thomas Washburn and Edward Fobes. It is not  a coincidence that this Samuel Packard and Thomas Washburn were executors of Samuel Packard, Sr.’s estate. Years later, in April 1702, Elizabeth, again a “widow,” would sign a document about John Washburn’s heirs, receiving some rights. [67] What happened to her after this is not known.

As the years passed, Samuel Packard Jr., John, and Nathaniel would blaze their own paths. In  February 1689, Samuel Jr. would purchase land. This record specifically called him an ensign. Hence, it could be said, that this record is indirect evidence that he served in Bridgewater’s first militia company. [68] For the rest of his life he would be called an ensign, sometimes only as “Ensign Packard.” As the years passed, John, Samuel, and Nathaniel would own land in Bridgewater. [69] Samuel would gain a level of prominence in local government. Apart from paying to enlarge the meeting house in 1695, he would be chosen as a selectman in March 1695 and March 1696, along with serving as a juror for the  towns court the same year, and owning land within the town. [70] The others would not fair the same way. In 1696, John would assert his ownership to 70 acres in Bridgewater; Israel Augur/Augor would be given 15 acres, and Nathaniel would have acres laid out for him. [71] From 1705 to 1731, varying acres would be laid out for members of the Packard family. This included 2 ½ acres laid out for David Packard, seven acres laid out for John Packard, and four acres for Daniel Packard over this time span. [72] Such surveying, often by Josiah Edson, and buying of land, shows that steady social standing. On June 7, 1697, living a little less than 13 years after his father, Samuel Packard Jr., would die in Bridgewater. His probate, which would be reviewed in the 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, and 2000s by varying family researchers, would include an administrative bond of his wife Elizabeth Lathrop (administrator of his estate) and Thomas Washburn with a man named William Bradford in July 1698, along with another administrative bond between this Elizabeth and Thomas Snell in November 1697. [73] Then there’s his inventory. It shows him as a person who owns linen (and wearing) clothes, chairs, wheels, carts, blankets, woolen cloth, books & table, and arms and ammunition. [74] It also shows him as the owner of iron tools, saddles and bridles, flax, bags of linen, woolen clothes, leather boots, hogs, improved land, and plows, in keeping with the agricultural lifestyle of Packards. It would not be until 1699 than his probate would be finally settled as his lands would be divided up between his immediate and extended family, with guardians appointed for his children. [75]

Before moving onto the other Packards, it is worth mentioning the three children Samuel Packard Jr. had with his wife Elizabeth Lathrop (d. 1716): Samuel Packard III (1680-1749), Daniel Packard (1682-1731), and Joseph Packard (1684-1760). [76] Daniel Packard, Samuel Packard Jr.’s son, is worth covering since his story is intertwined with that of Samuel Packard III. On March 16, 1731, Daniel would sign a will dividing his estate between his four daughters  (Sarah, Mary, Susanna, and Martha), and doling out other lands to his sons Isaac (48 acres) and Daniel.  [77] Samuel Packard III would be his will’s executor. Daniel died five days after writing his will. He would have a wide-ranging inventory. [78] His possessions included 117 acres of “improved” land, 10  acres of land by a river, five cows, heifer (with a calf), large & small swine, a gun, a mare, and a colt. [79] The life of Daniel’s children cannot be fully determined. While existing records do not provide much information, it is clear that Job Packard would help administer Daniel’s estate in November 1745 and be the guardian to Nehemiah, one of Daniel’s sons, in the autumn of 1746 as he helped divide up the estate. [80] Adding to this, Daniel’s son, of the same name would manage his brother Nehemiah’s land the same year that he would be released from the guardianship of Samuel Packard III.

Samuel Packard III would marry a woman named Elizabeth Edson, possibly in 1705. They would have four children: Job (1716-1805), Paul, Bethiah (d. 1750) and Samuel Packard IV (d. 1774). [81] They would live in Bridgewater for years to come. Samuel Packard III, and his son of the same name, would be recorded as living in the town in 1704/1705. The former would be more in the business of purchasing a lot of meadow from the Leach family, 10 undivided acres from the Willis family, and a tract of land known as Costers Kitchen from the Leach family, which was a meadow lot near land which was owned by, you guessed it, Thomas Washburn. [82] In 1748, Samuel Packard III would die. In his will, written in November of the same year, he would show he is a Christian, like the other Packards before him, but would show he owned at least 140 acres, along with right to a lot in Cedar Swamp, land near West Meadow, along with certain amounts of pounds he gave to his immediate family, for the most part. [83] In April 1749, his administrators would list his inventory. He would own buildings and rights on land (consisting of most of the property value in his inventory), three swine, two beds and furniture, and books and apparel. [84] He would also own hogs, a head of cider, chains & old iron, barrels, tub & chests, an iron crow bar, guns and swords, a churner, a table, and a cord. While Job Packard would be his executor, no papers from his estate would survive, with only a sheet saying “see records” within the probate records of the state of the Massachusetts which are currently scanned and online. [85]

In August 1774, Samuel Packard’s son of the same name, Samuel Packard IV, would die. His estate files, which would be examined in 1978, by varying researchers, show he had an insolent estate managed by Adam Bailey, who distributed the estate funds and divided up the estate. [86] There was also his inventory. It would show that he owned, like the other Packards, wearing apparel, horse and cow, one feather bed, table lining, two swords, chests and boxes, glass bottles, chairs, pewter & earthen dishes and spoons, and iron kettles. [87]


Notes

[62] The sources range from “Millennium file[s]”; “U.S. and International Marriage Records 1560-1900”; “North America, Family Histories, 1500-2000”; “Family Data Collection – Births”; “Family Data Collection – Individual Records”; Even the Find A Grave entries are iffy as they include no gravestones. This means that the marriages of Hannah Packard to Thomas Randall (1671) and Clement Briggs (1669) cannot be proven other than the slight mention in Samuel Packard Sr.’s will. This also means we can’t confirm if Deliverance Packard, who married Thomas Washburn, had four children or the details of John Packard’s life, for example. Some sources say she married John Holbrook, based on a Find A Grave entry for “Elizabeth Stream Holbrook” (died in 1688) but this not the same as Samuel’s wife, Elizabeth, or that she married Thomas Auger in 1665. The only marriage that is confirmed is to John Washburn. It seems evident that Elizabeth and Samuel’s daughter, Elizabeth, was married to Thomas Augur and had a child named Israel who is mentioned in the last chapter.

[63] Agreement between the town of Rowley and the Village of Rowley (Boxford) regarding the boundaries between the two, 1685, Massachusetts Archives, Archives Collection, Series 2043, Vol. 112, p. 410, 412; Town Records Vol. 1-4, Plymouth, Bridgewater, Massachusetts, Town Clerk, p. 161, image 71 of 654. The next page shows Serjeant Packard, who was a proprietor, was part of committee to divide land.

[64] George Ernest Bowman, “Washburn Notes,” The Mayflower Descendant, no. 15, 1913, p. 247, 248, 249, 250; Will of John Washburn, Oct. 30, 1686, Massachusetts, Plymouth County, Probate Records vol. 1-1F, p. 84, image 49 of 490.

[65] Inventory of John Washburn, Nov. 12, 1686, MA, Plymouth County, Probate Records vol. 1-1F, p. 86, image 50 of 490.

[66] George Ernest Bowman, “Washburn Notes,” The Mayflower Descendant, no. 15, 1913, p. 251; Land transaction by Elizabeth Washburn, Massachusetts Land Records, Plymouth, Deeds Vol. 10, p. 333-335, images 183 and 184 of 651 Courtesy of Family Search; Mary paid her fair share from her father’s estate, May 22, 1697,  Massachusetts, Plymouth County, Probate Records, p. 304, image 161 of 490. Courtesy of Family Search. She would also pay Mary, her daughter, the money which was owed to her from Samuel Packard, Sr.’s will, in May 1697.

[67] Heirs of John Washburn, Apr. 15, 1702, Massachusetts Land Records, Bristol, Deeds vol 3-5, p. 83, image 304 of 806. Courtesy of Family Search; George Ernest Bowman, “Washburn Notes,” The Mayflower Descendant, no. 15, 1913, p. 252, 253. Her Find A Grave entry is no help here.

[68] Town Records Vol. 1-4, Plymouth, Bridgewater, Massachusetts, Town Clerk, p. 110, image 43 of 654.

[69] Town Records Vol. 1, Plymouth, Bridgewater, Massachusetts, Town Clerk, p. 136, image 73 of 94; Town Records Vol. 1-4, Plymouth, Bridgewater, Massachusetts, Town Clerk, p. 90, 128, 136-137, images 3352, 56, 57, 60 of 654. The latter record, in 1695, may say “four late of the Peckers” which could refer to the Packard family. On the next page, a “G. Pecker”mentioned. In 1702, Nathaniel Packard says he will help maintain bridge & other aspects for Courthouse. This is the “Packard Bridge” as some have noted in family histories.

[70] Town Records Vol. 1-4, Plymouth, Bridgewater, Massachusetts, Town Clerk, p. 119, 137-138 images 48 and 74 of 654; Town Records Vol. 1-4, Plymouth, Bridgewater, Massachusetts, Town Clerk, p. 120, image 48 of 92; Town Records Vol. 1-4, Plymouth, Bridgewater, Massachusetts, Town Clerk, p. 121, image 49 of 654; Town Records Vol. 1-4, Plymouth, Bridgewater, Massachusetts, Town Clerk, p. 142, image 59 of 654.; Town Records Vol. 1-4, Plymouth, Bridgewater, Massachusetts, Town Clerk, p. 147, image 63  of 654; Town Records Vol. 1-4, Plymouth, Bridgewater, Massachusetts, Town Clerk, p. 173, image 77 of 654. Years later, on March 22, 1702, Nathaniel Packard will serve on a jury for a local trial.

[71] Plymouth, Bridgewater, Land Records, Massachusetts, Town Clerk, Town and Vital Records, p. 254, image 147 of 767; Town Records Vol. 1-4, Plymouth, Bridgewater, Massachusetts, Town Clerk, p. 171, image 76 of 654; Town Records Vol. 1, Plymouth, Bridgewater, Massachusetts, Town Clerk, p. 171-172, images 91 of 92. On March 13, 1701, Nathaniel Packard and Israel Augor became surveyors of highways.

[72] Plymouth, Bridgewater, Land Recs, MA, Town Clerk, Town and Vital Records, p. 257-260, images 149 and 150 of 767.

[73] Probate of Samuel Packard of Bridgewater, 1697, Massachusetts, Plymouth County, Estate Files, images 1304, 1305, 1306, 1307, and 1311 of 1365.

[74] Probate of Samuel Packard of Bridgewater, 1697, images 1309  and 1310 of 1365; Probate of Samuel Packard of Bridgewater, 1697, Massachusetts, Plymouth County, Probate Records, vol 1-1F, p. 277-278, image 148 of 490.

[75] Probate of Samuel Packard of Bridgewater, 1699, Massachusetts, Plymouth County, Probate Records, Probate records vol 1-1F, p. 305, image 162 of 490; Guardians appointed, Nov. 25, 1697, Massachusetts, Plymouth County, Probate Records, p. 278, image 148 of 490. On 25 Nov 1697 Guardians are appointed for Joseph and Daniel Packard, Samuel Packard Jr.’s children; for Joseph (7 and ½ years old) it is Thomas Snell and for Daniel [15 years old] it is Nathaniel Bratt.

[76] See the Find A Grave records for Elizabeth Lathrop, Samuel Packard III, Joseph Packard (the only three here with a picture of a gravestone), and Daniel Packard.

[77] Will of Daniel Packard, Mar. 16, 1731, Massachusetts, Plymouth County, Probate Records vol 6-6U, p. 172-174, images 99 and 100 of 589. Also see Daniel Packard and Nehemiah within Liber 10, 35 in Oct. 1745, notes payments to Daniel, his son, that his son Isaac is dead, and to his son Nehemiah, with Samuel Packard III affirming this as the reality.

[78] Inventory of Daniel Packard, April 28, 1732, Massachusetts, Plymouth County, Probate Records vol 6-6U, p. 182-182a, images 103 and 104 of 589.

[79] He would also own four steers; four yearlings and a two year old;a cart, plow, and other team tackling; forks, shovels, hoes, and more; a crow bar and wedges; scythes; books & apparell; beds, bedstands, coverlids, and other bed furniture; sheets, pillowcases, blankets, table clothes and napkins; new cloth; chairs and tables; reel cords, wheels and wooden material; pewter dishes, spoons, and plates; Barrells, tubs, and other copper work; meal, houghs, corn and flax; metal pots and kettle; dogs; iron plates and glass vessels; panel, saw, and other house furniture; some old iron; Bogs and yarn; stone and earthen vessels; pan simmer knives and forks; two pots of fat; and a razor candlestick. Samuel Packard III would be named executor of the estate, finally probated on July 3, 1732.

[80] See the Find A Grave entries for Daniel, his wife Mary Harris, his daughter Sarah (alt. Entry), and Martha. Also see the Records of Daniel Packard, 1745-1746, Massachusetts, Plymouth County, Probate Records, 1633-1967, Probate Records 1745-1749 and 1836-1849 vol. 10-10A, p. 51-52, 345-347, images 37, 38, 190, and  191, of 611. Courtesy of Family Search; Managing land, June 4, 1744, Massachusetts, Plymouth County, Probate Records, 1633-1967, Probate records 1742-1745 and 1844-1856 vol 9-9M, p. 242, image 132 of 583. Courtesy of Family Search; Freed from Guardianship, Massachusetts, Plymouth County, Probate Records, 1633-1967, Probate records 1742-1745 and 1844-1856 vol 9-9M, p. 325-326, image 174 of 583. Courtesy of Family Search. Job would die in 1805 ultimately at the age of 88 years old. The notes on his guardianship: Samuel Packard III acts as guardian of Daniel (1732), goes to Marshfield; Samuel keeps Daniel from 1 1/2 until 11 1/2 years old; In 1739, Samuel mends part of Daniel’s house; In 1740 and 1741, he pays “his rate”; In 1742, he pays Daniel in cash; In April 1743, he enters a bond with Daniel for rent; In October 1743 he gives Daniel one ox and a heifer; In 1744, he gives him one cow and calf; Daniel, Nehemiah, and Isaac [all sons of Daniel who died 1731] pay 182 pounds in rent for a ten year period going forward; Samuel is also the guardian of Isaac, keeps him from seven until age 17; Isaac gives his part in lending a man and house when he and his brother ran away; Says Isaac paid him rent for eleven years, same as for Daniel; Samuel is also the guardian of Nehemiah from ages 5 to 10. Sometime before January 8, 1753 he would die as noted here, here, and here, with an inventory including a panel of old wood and a dwelling house.

[81] These dates come from their Find A Grave entries or other information posted on their profiles on the Mills Family Tree on Ancestry.com. Bethiah would later marry a man named Wright Bartlett and have one child named Samuel (1736-1827) who would later marry to someone named Susanna Dunbar. He would have three children with her named Susanna, Lucy, and Susanna (again). This is only mentioned to give more context to the family.

[82] Town records vol 1-2, Plymouth, Bridgewater, Massachusetts, Town Clerk, p. 131, image 58 of 285; Land transaction between Samuel Packard, John Leach and Thomas Lack, Mar 12, 1714, Massachusetts Land Records, Plymouth, Deeds vol. 13-14, p. 221-222, image 490 of 545; Land transaction between Samuel Packard and Thomas Leach, Mar 9, 1718, Massachusetts Land Records, Plymouth, Deeds vol. 13-14, p. 222-223, image 491 of 545; Land transaction between Samuel Packard and David Leach, Jan. 26, 1719, Massachusetts Land Records, Plymouth, Deeds vol. 15-17, p. 230-231, image 274 of 709; Town Records Vol. 1-4, Plymouth, Bridgewater, Massachusetts, Town Clerk, p. 163, image 72 of 654; Plymouth, Bridgewater, Land Records, Massachusetts, Town Clerk, Town and Vital Records, p. 259, image 150 of 767; Plymouth, Bridgewater, Land Records, 1672-1834, Massachusetts, Town Clerk, Town and Vital Records, p. 260, image 150 of 767. On August 15, 1699, it was reported that two Packards were landowners in Bridgewater, one named S. Packard S. (referring to a Samuel Packard, Sr.?) and another just named Packard Se [possibly meaning Senior]. He also possibly had eight acres laid out to him January 1730, some of which was near Samuel Lathrop’s house.

[83] Will of Samuel Packard III, Nov. 17, 1748, Massachusetts, Plymouth County, Probate Records vol 12-12C, p. 63-65, images 45 and 46 of 596. The probate was ultimately settled in 1749.

[84] Inventory of Samuel Packard III, Apr. 7, 1749, Massachusetts, Plymouth County, Probate Records vol 11-11B, p. 244, image 135 of 642.

[85] Probate of Samuel Packard of Bridgewater, 1749, Case no. 15170, Massachusetts, Plymouth County, Probate Estate Files, Plymouth, images 1313 and 1314 of 1362. The other records available just relate to guardianship of one of his children by Samuel Packard III. The estate was not settled until January 1776.

[86] Probate of Samuel Packard IV of Bridgewater, 1775, no. 15171, Massachusetts, Plymouth County, Probate Estate Files, 1686-1915, Plymouth, images 1315, 1316, 1317, 1318, 1319, 1320, 1322, 1323, 1324, 1325, 1326, 1327, 1328, 1329, 1332, 1333 of 1362. One document in February 6, 1775 would say he died six months prior, which would mean that he died in or near August 6, 1774.

[87] Probate of Samuel Packard IV of Bridgewater, 1775, no. 15171, Massachusetts, Plymouth County, Probate Estate Files, 1686-1915, Plymouth, images 1329 and 1331, of 1362; Probate of Samuel Packard IV of Bridgewater, Massachusetts, Plymouth County, Probate Records, vol 24-25, p. 37-38, images 46 and 47 of 568, courtesy of Family Search.

One thought on “Chapter V: The children of Samuel and Elizabeth

  1. Pingback: The first in a line of Packards: the story of Elizabeth | Packed with Packards!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.